Understanding that other people's expectations about us directly and immediately affect our behaviour

posted Feb 6, 2011, 10:49 AM by Jess Maher   [ updated Feb 6, 2011, 11:40 AM ]
Understanding that other people's expectations about us directly and immediately affect our behaviour is a vital component in understanding how we can come to be quite different people across various social situations.

Understanding that other people's expectations about us directly and immediately affect our behaviour is a vital component in understanding how we can come to be quite different people across various social situations.

http://www.spring.org.uk/2009/12/how-other-peoples-expectations-control-us.php


False Consensus Effect

To put it a little crassly: people tend to assume that those who don't agree with them have something wrong with them! It might seem like a joke, but it is a real bias that people demonstrate.

http://www.spring.org.uk/2007/11/why-we-all-stink-as-intuitive.php

Attempts to organize, summarize, or explain one's own behavior in a particular domain result in the formation of cognitive structures about the self or self-schemata. Self-schemata are cognitive generalizations about the self, derived from past experience, that organize and guide the processing of the self-related information contained in an individual's social experience.
http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/psp/35/2/63/


is to do with cognitive dissonance. This is the finding that we try to avoid inconsistencies in our thinking which cause us mental anguish. It feels dissonant—the two ideas butting up against each other—not to comply after objections have been effectively dealt with; after all, if there's no reason not to do it, why not do it?
http://www.spring.org.uk/2010/10/dont-take-no-for-an-answer.php

  1. Liking: It's much easier to influence someone who likes you. Successful influencers try to flatter and uncover similarities in order to build attraction.
  2. Social proof. People like to follow one another, so influencers imply the herd is moving the same way.
  3. Consistency. Most people prefer to keep their word. If people make a commitment, particularly if it's out loud or in writing, they are much more likely to keep it. Influencers should try to gain verbal or written commitments.
  4. Scarcity. Even when companies have warehouses full of a product, they still advertise using time-limited offers that emphasise scarcity. People want what they can't have, or at least what might be running short.
  5. Authority. People are strongly influenced by experts. Successful influencers flaunt their knowledge to establish their expertise.
  6. Reciprocity. Give something to get something. When people feel indebted to you they are more likely to agree to what you want. This feeling could arise from something as simple as a compliment.

Unconscious motivators

Everybody wants to be accurate, to affiliate with others and to maintain their concept of themselves, however little awareness we might have of these goals. Effective persuasion and influence attempts can target one or more of these goals.

With these goals in mind it is possible to tailor persuasion attempts to the particular characteristics of an audience, rather than relying on transparent generic techniques. Whether it's at work, dealing with your boss, or at home negotiating with a neighbour, we can all benefit from thinking about other people's unconscious motivators. Then we can work out how to align our message with their goals.

http://www.spring.org.uk/2010/07/3-universal-goals-to-influence-people.php

The devil is in the press release

Submitted by Vikram on Fri, 15/10/2010 - 1:35pm
15 Oct 2010

The devil may not be in the details but a press release. In this case, Minister Simon Power ordering a review of “new media” by the Law Commission, it is even more so given that he used the same words in response to Parliamentary questions.

The review is a good step. Asking the Law Commission to lead it is also good. They have both the credibility and skills do a thorough job and develop balanced perspectives. And first talking about the issues and defining real problems before looking at possible solutions is good.

But there are many issues with the way the Minister has chosen to describe the review. They reveal assumptions and perspectives that are worrying and, in some cases, plain wrong.

Take the example of “It’s a bit of a Wild West out there in cyberspace at the moment...” If the intention was a bit of dramatic flourish then it’s no big deal. However, if that’s what the Minister really believes and is a starting assumption of the review, then we’ve got reasons to be very, very worried.


Comments